CHEAPER TUNDRA READY FOR CUSTOMIZING
Toyota just released a Work Truck version of the awesome Tundra fullsize truck. It's a lower-priced model aimed at construction workers and landscapers who don't care about items like leather seats, chrome bumpers, and lighted ignition key rings. We only care because the money you save by buying this truck versus a Limited or SR-5 Tundra can be spent modifying areas of the truck you're probably going to change anyway. The Work Truck is available in 4x4 and 4x2 models, with Toyota's awesome 381hp V-8 engine. Here's a list of the changes to the Work Truck:

*Black-colored manual mirrors instead of chrome power mirrors
*Washable vinyl seat and rubber floor mat instead of cloth seating and carpeted flooring
*Black instrument cluster and HVAC controls instead of silver
*Oil pressure and voltage warning lamps instead of gauges
*Cruise control and keyless entry no longer standard equipment but available as options
*Glovebox, ignition key, and door pocket lighting deleted

10 Mostly Worthless Facts
1. If you fart consistently for 6 years and 9 months, enough gas is produced to create the energy of an atomic bomb, unless you have Calin's stomach, then you can do it in a day and a half.

2. Scratch-and-sniff sticker technology works by taking the aroma-generating chemical and encapsulating it in gelatin or plastic spheres that are a few microns in diameter. When you scratch the sticker, you rupture some of these spheres and release the smell.

3. Sam Walton, founder of Wal-Mart stores, owned a red '79 Ford F-150, which he drove for years. The truck is now on display in Bentonville, Arkansas, at the Wal-Mart visitors center, which is real close to Mike's parent's house. No, he hasn't visited the truck yet.

4. The design and engineering plans for the Ford car-truck model, the Ranchero, were introduced in 1956, with production beginning in 1957. The Ranchero beat out the more well-known Chevy El Camino by two years.

5. Pable Picasso's full name was "Pablo Diego Jos Francisco de Paula Juan Nepomuceno Mara de los Remedios Cipriano de la Santsima Trinidad Martyr Patricio Clito Ruiz y Picasso."

6. After writing about his Tacoma in the March issue, Mike found out that it was totaled after the owner fell asleep at the wheel while driving it. RIP Burnt Taco!

7. Internal combustion engines are classified into internal and external air-fuel mixture formation categories. Internal air-fuel mixture engines have fuel that is introduced directly into the combustion chamber, a la diesel engines. External air-fuel engines introduce the fuel outside of the combustion chamber, usually in the intake tract or manifold.

8. In an auto-ignition engine, the air-fuel mixture ignites as it warms to or beyond its ignition temperature during compression, or when fuel is injected into air whose boundary conditions permit evaporation and ignition.

9. Today, Mike wore pants to work. Who knows what tomorrow will bring?

10. In the '80s, the Dodge Ramcharger's hood ornament was a popular theft item. Once Satan-worshippers realized it was attached to the hood with a miniscule spring-loaded fastener, it was game on!

Say What?
The staff speaks and you listen. It's that simple. This month's question is: What do you think of the current trend of taking vintage trucks, leaving the body and interior stock, and adding airbags and big wheels to them for a resto-mod look?

Kevin: I really dig it because the factory look of classic trucks is simple yet stylish. You don't need to overdo it with customizing them because they plain look good. Pretty much every truck looks better when planted on the ground, including restored classics. All-in-all, the resto-mod theme is a guaranteed winning look in my book because it will probably not go out of style anytime in the near future.

Calin: I don't mind this trend at all. I don't have any problems with multicolored slick paintjobs, but there is something really cool about a solid color on the older trucks. Plus I think this is a good way of building a custom truck. While this trend is cool, I hope that guys will still build shiny late-model trucks; I like those too.

Mike: I like it as a temporary look unless the truck is a vintage, collectible example, which there are very few of. It's a good low-buck theme to get you started, but at some point you've got to move on with the mods and get rid of the patina. Patina on a contemporary truck is simply rust waiting for a repair.

Andy: If it is done right I think this look can be really awesome. The truck has to be rolling on the right set of wheels though. They have to complement the style and lines of the truck they are on, just as if you were to choose a set for a modern ride. If the wheels look way to modern or wild on an old truck, I think that's an odd fit. As far as airbags go, hell yeah! There's something totally cool about seeing a truck just slam to the ground when the airbags deflate. I think it kind of makes the old truck appear to be a little more high-tech with some modern suspension.

Sport Truck Slang Term O' The Month
#8,573: two-footers (kamel hump hed)
n. This is another slang term that denotes a wheel size. In this case, it refers to 24-inch-diameter rims and tires. Try using it in this sentence: That truck is rollin' on two-footers, but it ain't low enough to drag.

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