1990
Truck of the Year

Thom Taylor designed it and Bell Tech's Jim Ewing collaborated with Boyd Coddington and the GMC Truck Center in Santa Fe Springs, California, to build the Project S GMC that graced our very first custom-truck cover. This is the truck that set the custom world on fire. For the next decade, everyone wanted some 15-inch Boyds, scalloped paint, and a shortbed C1500.

1991
Truck of the Year

In the September issue, we found Brad and Karen Rose's '66 Ford F-100 at the F-100 Super Nats, where it won Truck of the Year. It's rare enough to find a custom '66, let alone one this freakin' cool. It easily beat out the rest of the feature trucks in '91 to take the title.

1992
Truck of the Year

This was a tough field of trucks to choose from, but Scott Montgerard's '66 El Camino is just plain bad. Featured in the October issue, the Elco featured some amazing paint-and-body work and a modified set of Iroc wheels that looked right at home with the 6-inch dropped stance. But the most daring mod was probably the deleted chrome trim from atop the bedrails.

1993
Truck of the Year

The Trader's '72 C10 took the trophy by a landslide in '92. One-piece windows, shaved driprails, and a monochromatic chassis and motor were all mods that were ahead of their time. This is a timeless custom.

1994
Truck of the Year

It's chopped, it's shaved, it's a '73 C10 with a '92 Chevy grille assembly grafted onto the fiberglass front end. Even without the 700hp Dyers-blown and Hilborn-injected small-block, Terry Cook's street machine looked insane.

1995
Truck of the Year

It's not sacrilegious to stuff a blown Chrysler Hemi between the fenders of an F-100, and it wasn't a faux pas in '95 to paint the Effie pink either. The polished tin work in the bed, Pro Street-style roll cage, and pink tweed interior all add up to a truck that belonged on the cover, even if it didn't make it.

1996
Truck of the Year

Dustin Whipple's '94 Chevy C1500 is important for a few reasons. It was one of the first cover trucks to feature tribal graphics, and Dustin would remain a staple of the custom-truck industry thanks to his Dad's business, Whipple Superchargers.

1997
Truck of the Year

Powered by a Viper V-10 and suspended via a Viper IRS and brakes, the Sidewinder gave us a glimpse of what the Dakota could morph into later on. Of course, it didn't morph into anything like the Sidewinder, but this Metalcrafters project was easily the baddest truck of the year. Doesn't Chevy's SSR look awfully similar?

1998
Truck of the Year

We had a tie. We know we suck, but damn it if Alan Budnik, John Bohannon, and Mike King didn't build the sickest trio of Chevys we've ever seen. Budnik's truck featured a handmade grille, hideaway headlights, and a reshaped bed. Bohannon's truck was a work of art with a complete Corvette drivetrain, including the IRS, and a custom sheetmetal bed floor that was perfectly straight. And who could forget the 406-inch small-block-motivated Lobelly Chevy Blazer? It had a sheemetal tonneau that flowed down to a custom center console, a '60 Impala dashboard, and the windshield was laid back on this permanent roadster.