It's been said that stock is good. But to the thousands of truck enthusiasts, that statement couldn't be farther from the truth. The daily work routine and monthly bills are just a couple of things that make you feel like just another micromanaged worker bee. The outlet for individuality and escape from the grind for these diehard enthusiasts is customizing their average trucks. Eric and Lisa Helfrich know that feeling of American freedom through building their '91 Chevy dualie. This work truck is a daily driver and carts Eric to his job as a longshoreman as well as hauls his goods and tools; customizing the truck hasn't hindered the truck's workload.

The dualie gets its stance from an air-ride suspension and 3-1/2-inch channel drop. The air-ride control switches are mounted in the overhead console. The truck lays frame and the fenderwells sit close to the front and rear axle centerlines. With the front wheelwells removed and the bed tubbed, the body envelops the tire and wheel combination. A set of APP 22-inch rims, mounted with 285/35R22 hides, makes the fitment tight. To bring the '91 dualie up to date, a late-model Denali front clip was grafted onto the heavy hauler. Sport mirrors replaced the stock units, and a roll pan covers the rear of the bed where a bumper once sat.

The dualie sports the original Chevy silver, which was adapted to the new mirrors and roll pan. The setting off of the stock color was done at Maxwell Designs in Houston, Texas. A set of tribal flames was laid over the hulk and filled with a dark blue. A drop shadow was airbrushed to give the flames a three-dimensional look. The gun was refilled with a lighter blue, and a skull was submerged into the flame on top of the hood.

Flowing the paint scheme into the interior was done with fiberglass door panels and a custom 'glass dash. The inverted paint theme runs into the interior, with the dark-blue pigment as the base color. A set of tribal flames was laid over the center section of the dash and filled with the stock silver. Venting the custom dash is a set of billet air vents, which complements the alloy two-gauge cluster and steering wheel. The stock seats were removed to make room for the four-bucket-style late-model Camaro seats that fill the truck's interior.

The heavy hauler pushes the 22-inch rims around by way of a 454 big-block engine. With a high-flow intake and custom exhaust system, hooking up the boat for a day on the lake is no problem. One thing is for sure: Eric and Lisa's Chevy dualie is a one-of-a-kind build. Keep on building, Eric.