Houston-based sport truck enthusiast Kevin Friend started building his truck after he bought it from a buddy because he wanted to start a hobby. After checking out his first effort, we'd say he more accurately started an addiction, and we're all better for it.

As with most custom builders, Friend started off by modifying the suspension. He and some of his pals installed a system that uses Belltech front lowering spindles and Firestone air springs to put the nose on the ground. They then installed a two-link air spring suspension on the rear axle to bring the back half down to Earth. The air suspension uses 1/2-inch lines, a 200-psi compressor, a 5-gallon air tank, and Parker valves. Friend said that he chose KYB shocks to smooth the ride. The suspension takes the 20-inch Eagle wheels stuffed in 255/30R20 Kumho rubber past the rim in a single gulp.

At a glance, it's easy to see that Friend put a lot of effort into customizing the body. He Caddy-clipped the nose, shaved the door handles and tailgate, and installed a roll pan, as well as grafting in a pair of Caddy taillights. A billet grille and Street Scene side mirrors were also installed before moving onto the interior.

Friend brought his paint theme into the interior with body-color accents on the dash and custom console, and by adding Full Metal Jacket billet trim and a steering wheel from Colorado Customs. The stock upholstery was replaced with gray leather with orange inserts. Of course, most of the interior design choices were driven by the fact that Friend had planned a 2,000-watt mobile entertainment system with the help of Mobil One in Houston. The system features a Sony head, a CD player and monitor, and a Kenwood DVD player. The system uses two Rockford Fosgate 1,000-watt Punch amps to drive a pair of Kicker Solobaric subs. The mids and tweets are powered by the four-channel, 35-watt Sony head unit.

To finish this project, our hero truck-builder had the exterior of his Silverado painted with Dupont Bright Orange at Jimmy's Paint and Body. With the base down, he then had Flash Gordon in Houston airbrush a set of license plates before hitting the truck with friendly blue-tribal fire.