What exactly is a stock-floor body drop? What's involved in the process?
Well, since this is the newest way to lay your truck's rockers on the ground, we figured it was about time to shed some light on the mystery that is the stock-floor body drop, and answer some of these questions. We teamed up with Cary Iaccino and the IF Customs crew to show you the basic process of everything that goes into the chassis and body modifications of a stock-floor body drop.

The basic idea of a stock-floor body drop is to lay the rockers on the ground by extensively modifying the stock frame, or building a completely new frame. With a modified frame, the body mounts can be moved down and the top of the frame can be cut away, enabling the rocker to sit flush with the bottom of the frame. This allows the truck's floor to only be modified around trouble spots, such as the tranny tunnel, the driveline, the firewall, and possibly the gas tank. The benefits include retention of interior space, more headroom, stock ride characteristics, stock carpet, and most importantly, a lower ride height.

This might sound like a modification that anybody who can weld is able to perform, but anytime you're messing with the factory frame structure, you better know exactly what you're doing. Your truck's ride, safety, reliability, and appearance are on the line whenever the stock frame is extensively modified. This is not meant to be a do-it-yourself how-to article. This is meant to strictly show the basics of the process to help you understand what's involved. A stock-floor body drop is more labor-intensive than a traditional body drop, and all the other clearance issues still need to be dealt with. The bed is generally handled by using traditional body-drop methods: cutting out the bed floor and raising it up 2-5 inches, depending on the size of your body drop.

The main areas we'll focus on are the frame modifications, the cab modifications, the engine bay mods, and the bed. For this particular body drop, the frame was cut and boxed in, the tranny tunnel was raised, and the firewall was tubbed for 24s. The engine bay was taken care of by relocating everything that was in the way, including the brake booster, the computer and fuse box, the battery, the wiper cowl, and anything else that got in the way of the wheel/tire combo. Follow along as we cover these four main areas of a stock-floor body drop.

End Note
These are the main areas that have to be addressed. There are still many other things that will need to be taken care of, including exhaust, crossmembers, possible driveshaft modifications, bodywork, and paint. This serves as an overview of the work involved in the newest way to lay your body flat on the pavement.

SOURCE
IF Customs
www.ifcustom.com